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Metyrapone is used for the medical control of hypercortisolism in Cushing's syndrome (ACTH dependent or independent). The aim for medical treatment is to achieve pre-operative control of hypercortisolism, or for control of residual disease persisting post-operatively (TSS, adrenalectomy). It is not for long term definitive treatment/cure, only as an adjunct (surgery is the aim for cure in most causes of Cushing's syndrome). Metyrapone hence acts by inhibiting adrenal steroidogenesis. One side effect is hirsutism (in women) because of the excess androgen precursors created. The other commonly used agent for medical treatment of Cushing's is ketoconazole (an anti-fungal agent). This does not exhibit the side effect of hirsutism.

Injectable steroids are injected into muscle tissue, not into the veins. They are slowly released from the muscles into the rest of the body, and may be detectable for months after last use. Injectable steroids can be oil-based or water-based. Injectable anabolic steroids which are oil-based have longer half-life than water-based steroids. Both steroid types have much longer half-lives than oral anabolic steroids. And this is proving to be a drawback for injectables as they have high probability of being detected in drug screening since their clearance times tend to be longer than orals. Athletes resolve this problem by using injectable testosterone early in the cycle then switch to orals when approaching the end of the cycle and drug testing is imminent.

Fluid and electrolyte disturbances: Retention of sodium, chloride, water, potassium, calcium, and inorganic phosphates.
 
Gastrointestinal: Nausea, cholestatic jaundice, alterations in liver function tests, rarely hepatocellular neoplasms and peliosis hepatis (see WARNINGS ).
 
Hematologic: Suppression of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X, bleeding in patients on concomitant anticoagulant therapy, and polycythemia.
 
Nervous system: Increased or decreased libido, headache, anxiety, depression, and generalized paresthesia.
 
Allergic: Hypersensitivity, including skin manifestations and anaphylactoid reactions.
 
Vascular Disorders: venous thromboembolism

Miscellaneous: Inflammation and pain at the site of intramuscular injection.

Betamethasone dipropionate was patented by Merck in 1987 as an augmented cream/lotion, Diprolene in the ., and Disprosone in Europe. [7] These patents expired in 2003 and 2007 respectively leading to generic production of betamethasone dipropionate. During this time other topical corticosteroids such as triamcinolone acetonide and clobetasol propionate also became available as generic creams. Merck filed for "pediatric exclusivity" in 2001 launching a clinical trial to prove betamethasone dipropionate's safety and efficacy for use in pediatrics. [8]

Test 100 propionate

test 100 propionate

Betamethasone dipropionate was patented by Merck in 1987 as an augmented cream/lotion, Diprolene in the ., and Disprosone in Europe. [7] These patents expired in 2003 and 2007 respectively leading to generic production of betamethasone dipropionate. During this time other topical corticosteroids such as triamcinolone acetonide and clobetasol propionate also became available as generic creams. Merck filed for "pediatric exclusivity" in 2001 launching a clinical trial to prove betamethasone dipropionate's safety and efficacy for use in pediatrics. [8]

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